Tribal-Exhaustion Doctrine – the general principle that when an Indian tribal court has jurisdiction, the parties must pursue all remedies available under tribal law before turning to nontribal courts

tribal-exhaustion doctrine:

(1995) The general principle that when an Indian tribal court, original or appellate, has personal and subject-matter jurisdiction, the parties must pursue all remedies available under tribal law before turning to nontribal courts.  *  A federal court may review a challenge to jurisdiction only after the tribal court has established it has jurisdiction and determined the case on the merits. See National Farmer’s Union Ins. Co. v. Crow Tribe, 471 U.S. 845, 856-57, 105 S.Ct. 2447, 2454 (1985).”

References:

[1]: All definitions, unless otherwise specified, from Black’s Law Dictionary Deluxe Tenth Edition by Henry Campbell Black, Editor in Chief Bryan A. Garner. ISBN: 978-0-314-61300-4 

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